ARRRG! 10" segmented ring

John H

PRO Member
So my wife decided she wanted a tornado cookie jar. Easy enuf. Fire up segment pro, pick a suitable profile, 36 segments, .5" wood, pick the palette, and press the tornado button. Poof gives me all I need. Out to the shop, cut the segments and then start to put the segments together for glue up - with large rubber bands. After about an hour of fighting with segments that magically turned into mexican jumping beans (and my smart watch actually telling me to "relax" (bp monitor)) I yelled uncle, and am here hoping you fine folks have a far better way to do this. Help!
 

Gary Beasley

PRO Member
If you know the minimum inner diameter of the ring you could cut a disk for the center of the ring to help guide the pieces into a circle as you glue them up. Would probably need to wrap the edge in tape to keep the glue off of it. I have used hose clamps linked together for doing a ring, not so likely to cause a pop as you tighten it up.
Another thing to try if you want to use rubber bands is to make a ring of finishing nails tacked in a circle around the ring and drop the bands on that. Then you can release the rubber band onto the ring in increments until you have in all in place.
 

mfisher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Building rings you can use large worm pipe claims.

I have had success just building pairs. glue two segments together so you send up with 16 glued. Then glue those together to make segments of four pieces. Then glue those till you have two halves of 8 segment pieces. If your segments are good you can glue the two halves together without any sanding of the side edge to make a perfect fit. The ring can be clamped with a worm type pipe clamp

Most of the time by the time I finished glued a pair and hand squeezing for 15 or so seconds. I then can start glued the 2 pairs together. So wait time is pretty much nil.

You the ring view in SP to assist in the proper layout of segments for each ring. I have also numbered the top surface of the segments with numbers 1 to 36 to ensure I glue in the right order. That top part sill be sanded down to ensure its flat and the sanding removes the numbers.

Have fun. The more the segments the more challenging the glue up.
 
N

Newburnt

Guest
Building rings you can use large worm pipe claims.

I have had success just building pairs. glue two segments together so you send up with 16 glued. Then glue those together to make segments of four pieces. Then glue those till you have two halves of 8 segment pieces. If your segments are good you can glue the two halves together without any sanding of the side edge to make a perfect fit. The ring can be clamped with a worm type pipe clamp

Most of the time by the time I finished glued a pair and hand squeezing for 15 or so seconds. I then can start glued the 2 pairs together. So wait time is pretty much nil.

You the ring view in SP to assist in the proper layout of segments for each ring. I have also numbered the top surface of the segments with numbers 1 to 36 to ensure I glue in the right order. That top part sill be sanded down to ensure its flat and the sanding removes the numbers.

Have fun. The more the segments the more challenging the glue up.
 
N

Newburnt

Guest
I use the same method as Mfisher. I find the pipe clamps are more effective once you have assembled both halves of the segmented ring. I don't glue the two halves until all the previous segments are securely dried. Then I dry fit the 2 halves together to make sure that each end fits snugly. If the two halves don't fit perfectly, I carefully sand the ends of both halves using the disc sander. If you don't own a disc sander, sand each half using a strip of sandpaper on a flat service until the ends fit perfectly. NOTE: Hold the half ring in your hand so that ring is vertical and both ends are flat on the sandpaper.

I hope I made myself clear. Good Luck!
 

Ken Sherwin

PRO Member
I made a straightedge from a Corian scrap and glued it to a slightly wider strip of Corian. To use it,

1. Lay a strip of blue painters tape that's longer than the circumference of your next ring face up next to the straightedge and tape the loose end down. Let the roll of tape hand over the end to hold it in place.

2. Stick all the segments on the tape in order and tight against both each other and the straight edge. This step is really important!

3. Apply glue (I use Titebond Original) to all the segments without moving the segments.

4. Tear off the taped down end of the tape flush with the end segment and tear off the roll of tape leaving about 3 inches of tape as a loose end.

5. Now for the magic. Lift the strand of taped-together segments and flop it over onto it's side. I lay it on the Formica-covered outfeed table of my table saw.

6. Pull the ends together until glue is squeezing out of every joint then secure it with that loose end of the tape. You now have a solid ring that you can safely handle.

7. I go the extra step of putting a hose clamp around the ring until the glue dries. The tape not only holds the segments together until you can get it to look like a ring, it keeps the glue off of the hose clamp.

8. Wash the glue off of the straightedge and the flat work surface. Do this after every ring or the straightedge won't stay straight and the flat work surface will not stay flat. This is possibly the most important single step. Skip it at your peril!

It actually takes longer to read this process than to do it but everything stays in complete control all the time. I glue the whole ring at one time because my segment jig and table saw cut segments with the correct angle.

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