steady rest for tall segment vessels

Cameron Johnson

New Member
Sorry... that was 80/20 1515 not 1516 (typo). The corner brackets and hardware are all 80/20 also. I used mainly triple plates but had to get the knobs from a hardware store. All the hardware is 5/16-18...again from 80/20. Size to fit your lathe. I used 3 two ft. 1530 for the frame and two 2 ft 1515 for the cross members. I extended the base with some short pieces of 1515 to make it more stable and adapt to my Robust lathe. Oh.....to keep the brackets holding the wheels from turning I welded an allen into the double nut bracket (you can use epoxy if you want or just use another knob).
 

stuart johnson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Cameron, This is great. You are correct, the photos give enough information to build one but a DIY document possibly with links to parts would be helpful. Thanks for posting.

I just did a search for 80/20 1515. I had no idea stuff like this was so readily available.
 

Lloyd Johnson

Administrator
Staff member
You win, Cameron! That is a great design and thanks for making it public as I'll be making one myself. Somehow, you should get your name on it as Jamieson did with his hollowing system.
 

Cameron Johnson

New Member
You asked for additional info on the steadyrest. Attached is a DIY description and parts list. This description was written a few years ago but I upgraded it to reflect the current version. I'm not the best DIY writer so my apologies in advance for the lack of clarity. It really is pretty straight forward so with the above photos and the "less than perfectly clear" instructions you should be able to make one. I've seen many steadyrests but this is by far the best and most stable. It is easy to use so I use it all the time, even when not entirely necessary. It makes things safer and less likely to move off center. Any questions, just let me know.
 

Attachments

Bob Beaupre

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks Cameron, that steady rest sure looks nice, and the combination of pictures and your write up you will be a great help for someone who wishes to build one. Thank you for the contribution.

Bob
 

stuart johnson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thanks Cameron, I'm going to make one once I get a couple other things out of the way. I looked at the catalog on 8020.net and was amazed at the different extrusions and hardware available.
 

Cameron Johnson

New Member
I don't want to beat a dead horse, but I did manage to find a few new photos that might help building one if you were interested.steadyrest1.jpg steadyrest1.jpg steadyrest2.jpg steadyrest3.jpg steadyrest6.jpg steadyrest7.jpg steadyrest8.jpg steadyrest1.jpg steadyrest2.jpg steadyrest3.jpg steadyrest6.jpg steadyrest7.jpg steadyrest8.jpg
 

stuart johnson

Super Moderator
Staff member
No dead horses here. I appreciate the work you have done to show us how to build what looks like the best steady rest.
 

mfisher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Like others have said. Thanks for the photos and posting. What a great steady rest.
 

Ken Sherwin

New Member
I'm almost ashamed to show my steady rest after that one. I'm only doing it because it's not sitting on a Robust, either. :D:D It's 3 layers of 3/4" plywood with 3 gaps in the center layer. The gaps make a place for the steel wheel arms to run. Inside each gap is a tee nut, allowing a knob with a 5/16" male thread to push on the arm, clamping it in place. The frame is in 2 pieces so it can be installed or removed without removing the tailstock. Right now, I don't remember why I thought that was necessary.
IMG_1850.JPG

The piece I'm working on is a pine prototype of just the neck of a 30" tall vase / urn / dustable. The rows are 1-1/2" tall and my first prototype with 16 segments with 6 degree gaps shattered magnificently about 90% of the way through. That's why we experiment on stuff out of the cheep bin, right? This successful test used 6 segments with 10 degree gaps and it felt much more solid.
 
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mfisher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Ken.
Yours is another great stead rest. If I was going to build one it would be more along the lines you have build.
Lucky for me the shop at Sun City West has a couple of store bought steady rest to use.
 
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