Laser made segment bowl

Bluemax

PRO Member
I'm posting this because it is a little bit unusual to make the segments in a laser. I've posted a couple pictures in the middle of the build. In the end this will be about 1100 segments on a 32 row bowl. The main advantage to cutting out the segments with a laser is that there is no sanding ( I hate sanding those small pieces with my big hands) and the turniging is much safer and easier since the I.D. and O. D. are already round. You can see in the picture that I have part of the I.D. turned but haven't turned the O.Od yet. I generally turn the I.D. as I go and only rough turn the O.D. occasionally to keep it in balance. If anyone is interested I will go thru the process. I need to give some credit to Tom Lohman because I started with his design than altered the profile and color design to suit me. But I did start from one of his bowls and he is the master when it comes to this stuff. Anyway, thanks.
 

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Gateway

New Member
New to the club. Hi, everyone. Having health problems, so starting out with laser cut pieces would be a life saver for me. Question: Is it really necessary to run a lag screw from the inside of the faceplate all the way through to the base of the bowl?
 

mfisher

Super Moderator
Staff member
New to the club. Hi, everyone. Having health problems, so starting out with laser cut pieces would be a life saver for me. Question: Is it really necessary to run a lag screw from the inside of the faceplate all the way through to the base of the bowl?
Hi Gateway:
Most turners including me mount the faceplate to a waste block. The waste block used should be thick enough that the screws do not go through it. The waste block is turned round. Then turn/sanded flat on the top surface. When finished with a project the waste block is trued up again ready for the next vessel. After so many vessels you can add another layer of waste block to the one mounted on the face plate. Basically, in over 10 years I have never unmounted a faceplate.

To sum up. Mount your faceplate to a waste block. True it up. Glue your vessel bottom base to the waste block. True up the bottom. Your ready to go. Never have screws go into the bottom of your vessel.
 

Bluemax

PRO Member
I use a waste block on my turnings that has a routed groove down the middle a little wider than a small scraper. I mount the bowl to the waste block with double sided turner's tape. The groove is so I can drive a scraper between the bowl and the waste block to seperate them. I use a 1/4" lag screw to further hold the bowl to the waste block because I had one come off once causing a lot of damage to the bowl. It also helps center the base to the waste block when I start.
 

Bluemax

PRO Member
Sometimes I turn out a portion to fit the gold colored dollar coins ( just over 1" dia)the gvt put out( bowl bottom). I also just make up a small plug in a contrasting color that overlaps the hole ( inside bowl).
 
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