Lamination PRO Tutorials - Multi-Generation Laminations

Discussion in 'Lamination PRO' started by Lloyd Johnson, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    One of the rotations I presented at the Segmented Woodturners Symposium in Lake Tahoe was on Multi-Generation Laminations. As part of my talk, I showed four PowerPoint presentations. One was called Possibilities and it simply showed the kinds of projects that can be done with laminations. The others showed projects including Tips and Tricks for making a 2nd generation lamination, a Southwest Design and a project made from Radial segments.

    I hope you enjoy them, and please let me know if anything needs clarification.

    Lloyd
     

    Attached Files:

  2. David Malan

    David Malan PRO Member

    Hi Lloyd,
    Thanks alot for posting this thread. I enjoyed it and learned alot.
    Thanks again and regards.
    David Malan
     
  3. Oeistein

    Oeistein PRO Member

    Lloyd I I like these tutorials. Here is lots of inspirations, thanks. Oeistein Jensen.
     
  4. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Lloyd,
    Awesome handouts...I have learned much just by viewing the slides, but they sure make me wish I had been able to see them in person at the symposium..maybe next time 8>)

    Anyway, I notice the Dubby that you are using to cut your segments...and it looks like you use the Dubby on the 'right' side of the blade, but on the left side where the segment cut-off would be there is nothing. Since the Dubby must have 'some' height to it, do you just allow the segment to fall off onto the left side of the blade..??..and then you pick it up from there..??

    Thanks for all the great information you provide..!!

    Johnp
     
  5. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    segment cutting...

    Lloyd,
    Awesome handouts...I have learned much just by viewing the slides, but they sure make me wish I had been able to see them in person at the symposium..maybe next time 8>)

    Anyway, I notice the Dubby that you are using to cut your segments...and it looks like you use the Dubby on the 'right' side of the blade, but on the left side where the segment cut-off would be there is nothing. Since the Dubby must have 'some' height to it, do you just allow the segment to fall off onto the left side of the blade..??..and then you pick it up from there..??

    Thanks for all the great information you provide..!!

    Johnp
     
  6. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    John,
    Yes, the Dubby adds 1/2" height and this will cause problems if the wood is not supported while cutting. I also have a left-side Dubby and often have that in place when I cut segments from the right side of the blade. However, this leaves the new cutoff next to the blade and I really want it to be taken from the blade and placed aside in the order it was cut with the pieces I have already cut. And so here is what I do, but this is NOT a recommendation that anyone else should do it this way: If the strips I'm cutting from a board are 1-1/2" or more, I hold the edge of the board with my left hand as I'm cutting it. As I make the cut, I keep holding the strip in this position as I complete the cut and this is, in essence, how the strip is supported during the cut and the 'nub' is removed at the trailing end. The beauty of this is that I know that my fingers are more than 1" away from the blade and I now have the strip in my hand and ready to be placed aside. This saves me from having to retrieve the cutoff using a hook tool, a piece of wood or fingers and greatly speeds up the process.

    I've watched Jerry Cole, the owner of In-Line Industries, maker of the Dubby, use this technique for twenty years at the Woodworking Shows and I remember first thinking that this seemed dangerous. But since it guarantees that my fingers are 1" from the blade, I found no reason not to do this and I continue to play my banjo three-finger style with two additional fingers at the ready.

    Lloyd
     
  7. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Thanks for the answer Lloyd...I had to think about your answer though (just couldn't visualize that you were saying what I thought you were saying)...hope you keep playing the banjo for a long long time..!!! :)
     
  8. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    After 30 years of woodworking, I know when I'm in the 'danger' zone and being a very cautious person, I just don't do dangerous. The laws of physics tells me that this just doesn't fit that category, though, IMHO.

    Dangerous is going to the mall here in Portland or going to a major movie release on opening night.:(
     
  9. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Yea, I understand what you are saying...but now it's just sending your kids to school. Such a tragic depressing scene today ;(
     
  10. vrbradley

    vrbradley PRO Member

    Lloyd, I have a piece of mdf on the left side of the blade when I use the dubby, I also tapped the off fall sled with a 1/4 x 20 so i could attach a hold down, very similar to the one in the picture of my converted Incra sled I posted pictures of earlier. Even then it can feel scarey ...makes you think about what your doing for sure.
     
  11. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    Brad,
    I really believe that after a certain amount of experience, we all know that the task we are about to do is either safe or it isn't. The problem is that the temptation to try it anyway and hope for the best is always present. Usually, it is something like being able to get one more piece of wood from a board that is too short. The power of these stationary tools is just too great to take chances. It is a state of mind, but we just have to recognize the fine line and stay well on the safe side of it.

    I'm a big believer in hold-downs, but they can give a false sense of security and that is possibly the most dangerous thing.

    Lloyd
     
  12. Greenshields

    Greenshields PRO Member

    Hi Lloyd.

    I'm trying to learn how to make an Indian Blanket design feature ring for a segmented bowl. I'm new to this and am wondering if you have any step-by-step instructions you could share with me. I looked at the pictures in your Southwest Designs pdf document, and they help; but I still can't quite figure out what to cut when and what size.

    Thank you.
    Garry Greenshields
     
  13. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    Hi Garry,

    My wife and I are currently traveling and so I apologize for not responding earlier.

    Here are some tips that may make it easier for you to understand how to make your first southwest Indian blanket design. Remember that practically every SW design is made from a first generation lamination (a chevon pattern). The software will show you woe wide of a 'kerf' is to be removed from the center of the board and there is a pretty easy way to do this.

    First you you have to know how wide the board is and this calculation is not currently calculated. However, with the 1st generation on your screen, click the Clipping Region button and the manually adjust the measurement until the clipping region touches the top and bottoms of the 'ears'.

    Lets say that the clipping region is three inches and that the kerf you want to remove is calculated to be 1/2". Subtract 1/2" from 3" giving you 2-1/2". Now divide that by two giving you 1-1/4". On your table saw, set your fence to be 1-1/4" from the blade and cut your board by placing the ears of one side nagainst the fence. Then, turn the board around and repeat the process by putting the other ears against the fence. You should now have two identical boards and you have successfully removed the kerf from the center of the board.

    Now move the fence so that it is the distance away from the sawblade that is specified as your strip width. Cut the number of strips specified from each of the two boards. Make sure you use a hold-down device such as a Grrripper for safety purposes.

    Please let me know if you have any questions on these instructions.

    Lloyd
     
  14. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Lloyd,
    In your 'tips/tricks' pdf posted above, you use Rockler multi track and multi track clamps..got that.
    However, you also use two flat pieces with grooves and four bolts to hold the corners of the multitrack together when it's laying flat and 90-degrees to each other. Where did you get those pieces from..and what are they..??
     
  15. Bobsturnery

    Bobsturnery PRO Member

  16. Wayne Miller

    Wayne Miller PRO Member

    Before you start building you should look on this Forum. there is a thread on multi-gen cutting. At Bodwell shows pictures of his clamping fixture which has some different features from how Lloyd does it. For me it works better. Either way will work just a matter of having a permanent setup or having a clamping table.
    Wayne
     
  17. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Bob, saw your post yesterday but needed to call Rockler back and have them add to my order..just in case i decide to build Lloyd jig.

    Wayne, thanks for the info...am still searching for the thread you refer to...don't happen to have the link handy to you..??
     
  18. John Payton

    John Payton PRO Member

    Wayne, never mind..I found it..!!..that is a very sweet looking way to do it...really like that..thanks again for the info..!!..here is the link in case anyone else is interested http://woodturnerpro.com/discussion/382-multi-generation-guide-questions.html


     
  19. vrbradley

    vrbradley PRO Member

    Looks like you use the dubby just the way it comes with the addition of one hold down on the wood block?
     
  20. Lloyd Johnson

    Lloyd Johnson Administrator Staff Member

    Brad,

    Yes, that is correct. At one time, Jerry of In-Line Industries sold an attachment that connected to his fence that extended to the other side of the saw blade and you could set a stop there and clamp the segment that was to be cut off. This was a great addition and I wish it were still available but for now, I just use his product exactly as it comes.

    I do have both a left and right Dubby, though, and I'll often have them both mounted at the same time and use one for cutting and the other for retrieving the cutoff.

    Lloyd
     

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