Open segmented tear outs

Discussion in 'Open-Segment Turnings Forum' started by Paul Merrills, May 27, 2017.

  1. Paul Merrills

    Paul Merrills New Member

    What I have found, is that everything that should be ok, leaves me in wonder as to why me! Ok, I am trying my first open segment vase and find the edge tear outs. Not sure what to do, so I could end up with something that looks half way decent. Is this something that a professional would would ever do? Thanks guys looking forward to seeing your great turnings. Paul Merrills
     
  2. Glenn McCarron

    Glenn McCarron PRO Member

    HI Paul. I guess I would start by asking a few questions that will better help other members identify what might help you. How many segments per layer are you using? What type of wood are you using? What tools are you using to start with?

    My most recent piece was 72 pieces per row of open segment. The best advise I received on this forum was to start by power sanding. This will help knock off the sharp uneven corners. I then used my Easy Wood circular carbide cutter to do the shaping. I used EXTREMELY light cuts taking all the time I needed. This is the only tool I used for the entire bowl.

    In my particular case the bottom few rows were extremely thin so I shaped those by strictly sanding. I had a few mistakes on my first three rows so it gave me an opportunity to practice turning. The first time I touched a chisel on these rows it simply tore most of it off. I rebuilt the base and the second time on the lathe I managed to touch the ends of a row and snapped the overhanging edge completely off. A bit disappointed I glued up a third start. This time I only power sanded and managed to complete the shape I wanted. From there after adding 5 or 6 layers I would power sand then turn. Add some more and do it all over again. I would also turn at about 8-900 rpm.

    Once you add a bit of information I'm sure others will chime in with their thoughts. Great group of members here.
     
  3. Paul Merrills

    Paul Merrills New Member

    That sounds reasonable. I believe that I am using to much pressure. It is combo of walnut and maple and ash. I have not used the skew, but do have two different tools that use the round carbide inserts. This is a taller vase with rings of wood rather than segments this time, until I get to the open part and then there are 10 of those. Lloyd made the suggestion to get on the forum, glad I did, sure is going to be helpful to this beginner. Before I leave I want to thank each of you for giving of your time to help others. Really a nice bunch of guys.
     
  4. Glenn McCarron

    Glenn McCarron PRO Member

    Paul typically when you do segmented turning you are not dealing with any end grain at all thus making the turning relatively smooth. Maybe post a few pictures of what you are trying to accomplish. Are you just adding layers of solid wood or is it segmented?
     
  5. Paul Merrills

    Paul Merrills New Member

    On this one it is solid rings until I get to the open segmented part, then it goes to the solid ring. If it gets done and not just fire place wood. I will upload it.
     
  6. mfisher

    mfisher Super Moderator Staff Member

    Hi Paul.
    I don't have anything to add that Glenn has not posted.
    I did move your post to the Open Segment Forum instead of in the Introduction forum.

    Welcome to WTP. I like your post and question. We are all here to learn.
     
  7. Glenn McCarron

    Glenn McCarron PRO Member

    If I understand what you mean by solid rings I suspect you are dealing with end grain tear out. Here you need to ensure you have sharp tools with proper presentation to the wood so the tool is cutting and not scraping. I would probably be using a Bowl Gouge with a fingernail grind to do your shaping. I'm sure there are probably lots of online video's to show you tool technique or others on the forum may have some sites to suggest. I'm just surmising here though.

    You can post a picture of your current project if you like. It may help get some good responses.
     

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